New iPad Air and iPad eighth-gen offer major tablet upgrades

Apple unveiled a new eight-generation iPad, entry into its tablet line, and a completely redesigned new iPad Air, just in time for iPadOS 14. The new iPad tablet line will start at $ 329 for general buyers, while the new iPad Air borrows the style of the iPad Pro and features a new on / off button with an integrated Touch ID sensor.

iPad eighth-generation

Apple’s 10.2-inch iPad is designed to serve home users who want a basic, affordable tablet, children to college-age students, and those who want a taste of digital art. It looks a lot like before, but uses a newer processor, the Apple A12.

Source:slashgear

It will support Apple Pencil, of course, for handwriting, draft and annotation recognition. IPad OS 14 can also convert sketches to the shape you wanted, such as turning scribbled circles into perfect circles. Alternatively, it also supports the handling of handwriting as typed text, for searching and more.

Source:slashgear

The eighth-generation iPad is available for order starting today, priced at $ 329. Education buyers will be able to get it for $ 299. Shipping will start from this Friday.

New iPad Air

At first glance, you can confuse the new iPad Air 4 with the iPad Pro. Certainly, it is borrowing the crisp style of this model – something that Apple should also do for the iPhone 12 later this year – but with five different colors and more attractive. They are silver, space gray, rose gold, green and sky blue.

Source:slashgear

It has a 10.9-inch Net Retina display, larger than the old Air, but with the same overall footprint as the tablet. This works at a resolution of 2360 x 1640. Since there is now no room for a home button and its integrated fingerprint sensor, Apple has changed the Touch ID to the power button on the top. This, says the company, is the smallest authentication sensor ever and uses a new, faster Secure Enclave for faster recognition.

Source:slashgear

Also inside is the new Apple A14 Bionic processor, based on 5nm processes. It is a 40 percent increase in CPU speed over the old iPad Air and a 30 percent increase in GPU performance. A new, faster 16-core neural motor – double the old SoC – promises up to 2x machine learning performance. There is also a set of second generation machine learning accelerators, which are up to 10 times faster than before.

Source:slashgear

In a welcome change, there is now a USB-C port on the bottom, instead of Lightning, again following the iPad Pro. This is good for 10x the bandwidth, Apple promises, and can also lead to a screen external 4K.

Source:slashgear

There are stereo speakers and WiFi 6 is standard. Versions of the iPad Air with LTE will also be offered, with data rates up to 10x faster thanks to a new modem. To the front, there is a 7 megapixel FaceTime HD camera. This has a f / 2.2 aperture lens, supports Smart HDR and promises better performance in low light than on the old Air. It also captures video at up to 1080p 60fps.

Source:slashgear

The rear camera, on the other hand, is borrowed from the iPhone 11. It has 12 megapixels, f / 1.8 aperture and enhanced video stabilization. It can record 4K images at 60fps or, alternatively, 240fps slow motion video.

Source:slashgear

The same Apple Pencil as the iPad Pro is supported and you can charge it the same way, with the stylus magnetically attached to the side of the new iPad Air. Apple also made it compatible with the same smart keyboard cover as your most expensive tablet. .

Source:slashgear

Apple says the new iPad Air will begin shipping next month, with prices starting at $ 599 for WiFi-only versions and $ 729 for WiFi + LTE versions. It will come in 64 GB and 256 GB storage options. Apple Pencil 2nd Generation will cost $ 129, while the Magic Keyboard and Smart Keyboard Folio for iPad Air are available for $ 299 and $ 179, respectively. Smart Folios – in black, white and three new seasonal colors, including deep navy, cypress green and citrus pink – will cost $ 79 each.

News Reporter

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