Hey Google! The time has come for us to take care of everything

Google Assistant announcement main
Source: https://www.bgr.in

If 2018 has been a bad year for Facebook, then it looks like 2019 might be the worst yet. In addition to critique of its data practice, the search giant is also facing the irrelevance of regulators for its various platforms. In the midst of the ongoing challenge of protecting children on YouTube, Google has confirmed that one of its language reviewers has leaked confidential Dutch audio data.

The announcement sheds light on how data policy around smart hearing aids is still gray. While tech companies like Google and Amazon claim that their digital assistants only record audio when they hear the word awake, the framework is actually very robust. Amazon first sent private Alexa recordings to a random person and then confirmed that its employees are listening to customer voice recordings. Google has now confirmed that its contractors are also listening to your voice recordings.

Privacy and security discussions with technology companies

Technical companies are no stranger to controversy and have often been stronger. But the new kind of controversy affecting tech companies like Facebook and Google risks fundamental rights. The biggest problem is around how these technology companies collect user data and how they process or use them. Facebook and Google claim to collect user data to improve their products. However, the good faith with which users obeyed these terms seems to have been taken for a ride.

When the Cambridge Analytica scandal broke last year, it became clear that Facebook does not have enough security measures to prevent such an incident. The scandal saw the consulting firm erase data from 87 million people on Facebook without much effort. Although Google does not appear to be engaged in displaying user data, it has its own fair share of controversial practices. A survey last year found Google tracking movement of its users on iPhone and Android devices.

Technical companies are no stranger to controversy and have often been stronger. But the new kind of controversy affecting companies such as Facebook and Google risks fundamental rights. The biggest problem is how these technology companies collect user data and how they process or use them. Facebook and Google claim to collect user data to improve their products. However, the good faith with which users obeyed these terms seems to have been taken for a ride.

When the Cambridge Analytica scandal broke last year, it became clear that Facebook does not have enough security measures to prevent such an incident. The scandal saw the consulting firm delete data from 87 million people on Facebook without much effort. Although Google does not appear to be involved in displaying user data, it has its own fair share of controversial practices. A survey last year found Google tracking movement of its users on iPhone and Android devices.

Google’s dilemma

Google’s corporate mission is to “organize the world’s information and make it universally accessible and useful.” The information is no longer limited to conversations and it is available in various streams and services. In the past few years, Google has repositioned itself as an artificial intelligence company. It has been weaving AI into everything, whether search or Android. The dilemma for Google led by Sundar Pichai is that improving AI not only requires more data, but also unique sets of data.

While gaining access to data such as a search section or Google Photos images, voice data is the key. With voice tuned to become a primary interface, Google needs to understand voice and commands better than rivals. However, if it does this by bending the rules and letting entrepreneurs listen in on user conversations, then trust to be the victim. Google is no longer high on a reliable barometer, its future actions will speak louder than voice.

What Google needs to fix

For starters, what Google needs to do is make it easier to read and understand their privacy policy. Most users accept privacy terms without even reading them. Technology companies need to list what data they collect and how they collect it. Rather than having legal jargon around, it needs to make information easily digestible. Second, it needs to impose strict restrictions on its contractors and employees who work in areas where sensitive data is collected and processed.

Just as sportspeople would not like outsiders to listen to their toilet, normal people do not want anyone to listen to their bedroom conversation. Next time, most people will probably ask “Hey Google, Can I Trust You?” Before they ask for weather updates. It also has to do a lot in the area of ​​Android, where privacy and security are agreed upon.

It was recently discovered that 1,300+ Android apps were collecting data even when permission was denied. Google says it will address this issue with an Android Q release later this year. Android’s slow update cycle means that only 10 percent of users will even reach the solution. This would be the right time for Google to have an App Review team similar to Apple. Check every malware tracking software and make sure they are doing what they promise. Little will begin to secure Android and so will other platforms secure.

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